Search the Collections

Portiere with Arms of the Visconti Family
Portiere with Arms of the Visconti Family
Date:
ca. 1690
Location:
Not on display
Century:
Media:
Silk, Wool, Metallic Thread; Tapestry Weave
Dimensions:
393.7 x 304.8 cm (155 x 120 in.)
Object Type:
Country:
Continent:
Europe
Culture/People:
Flemish
Accession Number:
1988.10.23
Acquisition Date:
1988-06-09
Credit Line:

Bequest of Whitney Warren Jr. in memory of Mrs. Adolph Spreckels

Supported by two winged figures of Fame holding fanfare trumpets, the arms of the Visconti family of Milan, surmounted by a crown, dominate a distant view of Lake Maggiore. The arms are displayed beneath a curvilinear portico draped with garlands held by amorini, above, and caryatids at each side. Young children at the base of the columns cling to large flower vases. A trophy of armor and weapons of war in the center foreground decorates a framed battle scene, an allusion to military prowess echoed by the blue cameo medallion of Victory on the portico above. The armorial portiere is believed to have been commissioned by Pirro Visconti Borromeo Arese of Milan (1666 – 1704), whose daughter Marguerita married his brother, Giulio Visconti. The latter was decorated with the Order of the Golden Fleece in 1721, which accounts for the collar of that order applied to the tapestry at a later date. From Anna Gray Bennett, "Five Centuries of Tapestry: The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco" (San Francisco: Chronicle Books; The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 1976; repr. 1992): 198.

Contemporaneous Works “Art from the same century and country”

Seat covering
Seat covering (17th century)
Verdure
Verdure (early 17th century)
Edging
Edging (late 17th century)