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Juno Typifying Air, from The Seasons and the Elements series
Juno Typifying Air, from The Seasons and the Elements series
Date:
ca. 1784
Location:
Not on display
Century:
Media:
Wool, Silk; Tapestry Weave
Dimensions:
362.4 x 271.8 cm (142 11/16 x 107 in.)
Object Type:
Country:
Continent:
Europe
Provenance:

possibly sent by Louis XVI to Prince Henry of Prussia, 1784

Accession Number:
1926.80
Acquisition Date:
1926-07-19
Credit Line:

Gift of Archer M. Huntington

Exhibition History:

Les Portieres des Dieux, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Legion of Honor, 1972
Five Centuries of Tapestry, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Legion of Honor, 1976
National Tour: Five Centuries of Tapestry, Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, New York, 12/3/77- 1/29/78; Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego, 5/13/78 - 7/2/78; Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, 9/13/78 - 10/29/78
New Look to Now, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, de Young Museum, 1989 - 1991
allery 9 Rotation, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Legion of Honor, 1990 - 1991
European Masterworks from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Japan, 1992

The portico of Juno, queen of heaven, is decorated with airy objects. Birds of many kinds flutter above her canopy and alight on its frame. Two birds of paradise support a garland in which flowers alternate with bunches of feathers. Above Juno’s head, crossed scepters are crowned by a circlet of feathers. A winged child’s head blows wind from beneath the cloud on which she sits. Vessels of goldsmith’s work decorate the consoles, each surmounted by a magnificent peacock, Juno’s bird. An organ and crossed trumpets at her feet form the central trophy. Below, two putti play other wind instruments: the flute, at left, and the syrinx, or pan pipes, at right. Musettes (bagpipes) hang above the portico. Ribbons at the sides support a series of pendant objects: rackets, shuttlecocks, and two panels with a bird and beast. Audran has given Juno’s airy portico four supporting columns of shuttlecocks. Juno was the guardian of finances. Her temple, on Capitoline Hill, contained by the Mint. This aspect of the goddess is suggested by the large central urn of coins with a cornucopia on either side, spilling out jewels and coins. From Anna Gray Bennett, "Five Centuries of Tapestry: The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco" (San Francisco: Chronicle Books; The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 1976; repr. 1992): p. 248.

Contemporaneous Works “Art from the same century and country”